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The Collection

The School of Maximalism

Here’s the thing. Unlike most hotels, we don’t think art should blend into the background. Do you really want to see the same painting in every room? (Housekeeping staff in those places must go nuts.) When we designed Hotel Max, we wanted it to be about art. Aesthetics. How you feel when you walk from room to room. Stuff that inspires. That’s why we filled our hotel, from the lobby on up, with original works of art.

As you explore the hotel, you’ll find a range of works – photographs, paintings, collages and sculptures – reflecting a myriad of voices and attitudes. Yep, that’s a Warhol in the lobby. It’s Campbell’s Soup Can I – Vegetable (F&S48).  There’s an Ed Ruscha, too: Gallo. And don’t miss Ivan Navarro’s stunning Revolution #2 – a sculpture that uses light and the suggestion of sound in the form of stacked drum heads to evoke the revolutionary spirit of his native Chile – or Skylar Fine’s playful Enjoy – a larger-than-life recreation of an iconic piece of American ephemera: the matchbook. Speaking of icons, we’ve got a signed prototype of the bass guitar Seattle’s own Krist Novoselic of Nirvana designed for Gibson. Also on display: The Artist Exploits by Josh Arseneau; Sleeping Muse by Andrew Keating; Come Away From Her by Kiki Smith; and Distanz – Samuel Beckett by Stephan Kaluza.

Upstairs, each of our guest floor hallways is dedicated to the work of an individual Seattle photographer, each of whom chose a theme – from architecture to romance – exploring it in photos large enough to cover the guest room doors. One of the most iconic collections of photos in the hotel can be found on the 5th floor, which features the works of Charles Peterson, the photographer who documented Seattle’s grunge era music scene.

Think of it as sleeping in a gallery of Maximalism.